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EIDX General Supporting Documentation
Status:  Provisional draft.  Adapted from previous published version (Balloted and Ratified by Membership, June 1997)

Reference Data


Contents

 


Using References

LIMIT ON REFERENCES WHICH TRADING PARTNERS MUST MAINTAIN

In general, the buyer should limit the number of references which sellers are expected to maintain in their systems and send back in response documents. The buyer should not expect the seller to maintain references needed only by the buyer; the buyer should maintain such references in their own applications. The seller should be responsible for handling only those references necessary for conducting business or necessary for systems processing, e.g., identifiers for matching response documents to original documents.

This recommendation applies to data elements throughout transactions/messages, including the following.

ASC X12 SEGMENTS

EDIFACT SEGMENTS

BEG, BCA, etc.

BGM

PO1, POC, etc.

LIN, PIA, etc.

REF

RFF

 

EXAMPLES OF REFERENCE TYPES

Part identifiers

Drawings

Third party’s references (order number, part number, etc.)

Contract numbers, price quote numbers, delivery quote numbers, etc.

Export reference numbers

Project numbers

 

RETURNING BUYER’S REFERENCE NUMBERS and CODES

While buyers should limit the number of references that the seller must maintain, some references are critical for the buyer to be able to process and match response documents. Data from initiating transactions in a business process should be returned exactly as they were received. Otherwise, the return of cross referenced or converted codes will require the initiating trading partner to cross reference the codes back to their initial internal codes.

In no case should leading or trailing zeros, spaces, or special characters such as dashes be added to any data. Such a practice results in data which will not match the original data that was sent.

Data that should be returned in response documents
Notes
Purchase Order Number Also Sending the Sales Order Number is optional but recommended.
Buyer’s Carrier Codes The seller’s Carrier Codes may not be meaningful to the buyer’s system unless they also cross reference seller carrier codes. It is best to use SCAC codes so neither system needs to cross reference the code.
Buyer’s Line Item Numbers Line item numbers are not always used, but if used, they are important to the buyer. This number is often used to match the data to the original data sent.
Buyer’s Part Number Integrity of the buyer’s Part Number should be retained. Seller Part data may also be returned, but the buyer part number must be returned.
Buyer’s Part Number’s Revision Number Integrity of the buyer’s Part Number’s Revision Number should be retained.
Buyer’s Release Numbers If the buyer’s release number is used, it is often important to the buyer. This number is often used to match the response data to the original data sent. Release numbers should be returned in response transactions. The use of Release numbers is becoming more prevalent between some trading partners. It is even used in lieu of the supplier’s invoice number in Payment/Remittance Advice transactions/messages (820/PAYORD/REMADV).
Unit of Measure Integrity of the buyer’s Unit of Measure should be retained.

RE-SENDING REFERENCES

The specific product data which is needed in a transaction depends on the transaction. Most often, it suffices to send only the buyer part and associated engineering change number, and/or the supplier part and associated engineering change number for component orders

The following items are recommended:

1. Engineering Changes (X12/UN Qualifier = ‘EC’) should always be re-sent since it is critical to determine the correct product.

2. If any drawing numbers and/or references are sent, they need only to be included in the initial transactions of the procurement process, i.e., the purchase order.

3. Drawing numbers and/or references need not be returned in transactions noted in the tables on the following pages. This data is already in the buyer's purchase order system.

4. Do not depend on re-sending drawings and/or references in Purchase Order Change transactions/messages in order to notify a trading partner that they have changed. There is no code available for the 860 (ASC X12) or ORDCHG (UN) Purchase Order Change transaction/message that indicates that a change has been made to references (usually drawings). The only way the recipient can tell if these codes have changed is to do an element by element comparison. There is no guarantee that the references are sent in the same order as on the original PO. It is also not easy to tell if drawings have been added or deleted. There are two recommended methods for conveying specification changes:

Method 1: One of the functions of the 841 Product Specification (ASC X12, EDIFACT equivalent yet to be identified) is to convey specification changes and effective dates. The sender can indicate whether the changes apply to all open orders or to specific orders.

Method 2: If a product’s specification changes, and existing order can be closed out, issue new order which calls out the new drawings and other references.

EXPECTED REFERENCES IN A STANDARD PROCUREMENT PROCESS

These recommendations apply in an environment where the buyer is regularly procuring inventory parts which have a buyer part number assigned, and where an established relationship exists between buyer and seller as trading partners. This is traditionally modeled between OEMs and Manufacturers/Suppliers. In the Distributor and Manufacturer/Supplier relationship, only vendor part numbers are exchanged.

 

Product/Service Product ID

     
 

Buyer Part ‘BP’

Engineering Change ‘EC’ (for the Buyer Part)

Vendor Part ‘VP’

Secondary Packaging Drawing Other Drawing References
Purchase Order (Discrete or Blanket) YES YES ADVISED YES YES
Purchase Order Acknowledgment YES DEPENDS (see Note 1) ADVISED DEPENDS NO
Purchase Order Change YES YES ADVISED YES FOR ADDED LINES
PO Change Acknowledgment YES DEPENDS ADVISED DEPENDS NO
Planning Forecast YES YES ADVISED ADVISED IF PRECEDES PO
Material Release Forecast YES YES ADVISED YES NO
Discrete Release YES YES ADVISED YES NO
SMI Forecast (see Note 2) YES YES ADVISED YES NO
Invoice YES DEPENDS ADVISED DEPENDS NO
Ship Notices YES DEPENDS ADVISED DEPENDS NO

Note 1: This is per trading partner agreement. Many partners do not need anything other than their own BP on response documents. See also above "Limit on References Which Trading Partners Must Maintain."

Note 2: SMI = Supplier Managed Inventory.


 


Third-Party Reference Data


Transactions/messages referencing a third-party can pass between any of the following trading partners:


Terminology Used for Three Party Models

When an order is placed in a two-party model, one party is the buyer and the other is the seller. In a three-party model, the buyer sending an order to component supplier might be an end-customer or the buyer might be a distributor or contract manufacturer. To the CM, the OEM is a buyer, and to the OEM, the CM is a seller. Sometimes when a seller ships an order to a contract manufacturer, that CM is the end-customer, and sometimes another party (the CM’s customer) is the end-customer. To minimize confusion, the following terminology is recommended:

Term Used to Identify a Third Party Usage
Buyer Use in traditional sense to identify the party that is directly purchasing goods.
Component Supplier (CS) Used by a prime contractor, contract manufacturer or distributor to identify an component supplier as a third party.
Contract Manufacturer (CM) or Subcontractor Used by a prime contractor or component supplier when identifying a contract manufacturer as a third party.
Distributor (DS) Used by an end customer or component supplier when identifying distributor as a third party
Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) Used by a contract manufacturer, distributor or component supplier to identify an end-customer as a third party. This term is synonymous with "Prime Contractor"; the latter term is preferred, since not all Prime Contractors (end-customers) are OEMs.
Prime Contractor (PC) Used by a distributor, contract manufacturer or component supplier when identifying an end-customer as a third party. Historically, this term is synonymous with "OEM"; "Prime Contractor" is preferred, since not all end-customers are OEMs.
Seller Use in traditional sense to identify the party that is directly selling goods.
Third-party warehouse Use to identify a third-party warehouse.

 

Third-Party Identifiers

When referencing a third party in a transaction/message, the sender and receiver may need to be able to identify who the third party is, what the third party’s order number is, the third party’s part number, etc. Which qualifiers/ identifiers are used depends on which party is sending data to which, and who the third party is. Third-party identifiers are included in the appropriate sections in this document.


Identification of Order Numbers

In ASC X12, some segments have elements specifically meant to carry certain order numbers, i.e., a field specifically meant to carry the buyer’s purchase order number. Other order number references are sent in REF Reference segments. In EDIFACT, order numbers of all types are always sent in RFF Reference segments.

X12 REF01 (DE128) /
UN RFF01 (DE1153)




MEANING



COMMENT

CG

Consignee’s Order Number Used to identify order number of a third party. Use for Contract Manufacturer’s Order Number.

CO

End Customer’s Order Number Used by a contract manufacturer or distributor to reference the end customer’s or Prime Contractor’s order when sending data to a component supplier.

PO

Purchase Order Number Buyer’s Purchase Order Number

VN

Vendor Order Number Seller’s Sales Order Number

Last updated 06 February 2003