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Implementation (Technology) Options

Mixing and Matching Implementation Options

Special Notes:  

     Best Practices
     Examples of Mixing and Matching Options
Back to Basics of eBusiness Implementations

Best Practices

In the early days of B2B - the Traditional EDI days - it was thought that both partners needed to have the same implementation option at both ends, i.e. use of an EDI standard (X12 or EDIFACT) via a VAN with integration to back-end applications.   In reality, some partners were doing rip-and-read at their end.   With the advent of PC client solutions, one or both partners could be using such a solution.  Today there are many choices for partners to make, and it is not always necessary for both partners to use the same implementation options. 

Some companies may decide to support several options employed by their partners, and some may choose to use a third-party who takes in the company's canonical standard via that company's selected transport and routing option, and converts it to whatever each trading partner requires.

Click on each box in the graphic to see a description of the basic architecture components for that option.  In addition, the EC Technology Matrix provides summary comparisons of the technologies.

Examples of Mixing and Matching Implementation Options

For example, using the three categories of decisions above, Company A could select any of these sets of decisions (examples):

  1. Implement process for Discrete Purchase Orders, including Buyer-initiated and Seller-initiated changes processes, using the EIDX  business model and guidelines for the utilization of the X12 standard (Business Content choice), integrated to the Company A back-end purchasing application only with partners who have back-end integration (Business Integration choice), with messages enveloped per the ISO9735 protocol specified by X12 and transported via a secure leased line to a VAN (Messaging and Communication choice).
     
  2. Implement process for Discrete Purchase Orders, including Buyer-initiated and Seller-initiated changes processes, using the EIDX business model and guidelines for the utilization of the X12 standard (same Business Content decision as in #1), integrated to the Company A back-end purchasing application with partners who have back-end integration, plus have the VAN provide a web application that smaller partners can log into to view their orders (variation on Business Integration decision #1), with messages enveloped and encrypted and transported via HTTPS directly to the trading partner's server (for those trading partners that have back-end integration) or to the web application.  (different Messaging and Communication decision).

 

Last updated 02 March 2003